Airline Bumping You From a Flight? What Are Your Rights?

Lauren Perry
April 16, 2017

That includes all surveillance videos, cockpit voice recordings, passenger and crew lists, incident reports and other items.

Dao was randomly selected to de-board the aircraft when United Airlines personnel needed extra seats in order to travel for work. United Airlines sparked outrage on Monday for the treatment of a passenger who was physically dragged off a plane the airline had overbooked, and one of the security officers involved in the incident was placed on leave pending an investigation. Video shot by passengers showing the man's bloodied face went viral on social media, prompting a storm of protest.

In the second statement, Munoz describes the man as "disruptive and belligerent".

The CEO of United Airlines' parent company is pledging to review policies after a passenger was dragged off a full fight in Chicago. "To remove a booked, paid, seated passenger".

"I think my reaction to most issues is to get the facts and circumstances", he said. Dao, a 69-year-old doctor, has also hired Thomas Demetrio, a high-powered personal injury lawyer, according to a statement from Demetrio.

Still, United Airlines' CEO Oscar Munoz called the incident "truly horrific" and noted to employees that "no one should ever be treated this way".

"That is not who our family at United is", Munoz said.

The chief executive officer of United Airlines has had quite the week.

The customer who was dragged off of the United Airlines flight in a scene that triggered public fury toward the airline on Wednesday took the first step toward legal action against the carrier.

"The family of Dr Dao wants the world to know that they are very appreciative of the outpouring of prayers, concern and support they have received", the family's attorney, Stephen Golan, said.

Dao is said to be the only passenger of the four asked to leave the flight who did not comply. The Aviation Security Office is operated by the city of Chicago, but is not officially related to Chicago's PR-disaster of a police department.

Some House Democrats (and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, apparently) have even called for a congressional hearing into airlines' ability to intentionally overbook flights.

Other reports by VgToday

Discuss This Article