NK's missile test fails in 5 seconds

Nick Mcbride
April 18, 2017

Vice President Mike Pence arrived in South Korea Sunday morning, landing at the U.S. Air Force's Osan Air Base just hours after North Korea's failed missile launch.

The visit came a day after the embarrassing failure of a North Korean missile test which the USA and South Korea said exploded on launch.

On Sunday night, ahead of Pence's arrival to South Korea, Pyongyang appeared to have carried out an unsuccessful missile launch.

The US n ational security adviser cited Mr Trump's recent decision to order missile strikes in Syria after a chemical attack blamed on the Assad government as a sign that the president "is clearly comfortable making tough decisions".

Abe said that "we need to apply pressure on North Korea so they seriously respond to a dialogue" with the global community. "That the nuclear test did not happen will surely be seen as the pressure working".

On Friday, the NSC members discussed how to deal with a possibility that armed North Korean soldiers pretending to be refugees may try to enter Japan, Kyodo News reported. He is in South Korea as part of a 10-day tour of Asia.

Pyongyang insists it needs a powerful arsenal - including atomic weapons - to protect itself from what it says is the ever-present threat of invasion by hostile United States forces.

A White House foreign policy adviser traveling with Pence on the plane said that the United States did not need to take action "to reinforce their failure". Apparently sensing a worsening political environment, the US military sped up the deployment to try to get everything in place before the election.

Trump himself appeared to reinforce the stern USA message at the White House, replying "Gotta behave" when a CNN reporter asked what message he had for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Abe told parliament he would exchange views on North Korea with Russian President Vladimir Putin when they hold a summit meeting later this month.

Meanwhile, US Defence Secretary Jim Mattis has said that President Donald Trump and his military team are aware of the missile launch.

After a two-month policy review, officials settled on a policy dubbed "maximum pressure and engagement, " United States officials said Friday. While the North did not conduct a nuclear test, the specter of a potential test and an escalated US response has trailed Pence as he undertakes his Asian tour.

Saturday's parade in the North Korean capital combined with yesterday's failed missile launch made a sixth nuclear test increasingly likely.

Pence addressed the launch in an Easter dinner speech in South Korea and said it underscores the importance of the alliance between the US and South Korea.

Trump acknowledged on Sunday that the softer line he had taken on China's management of its currency was linked to Beijing's help on the North Korea issue.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said on CNN's "State of the Union" the Trump administration needs to develop a coherent strategy and must not act unilaterally. One day earlier, North Korea conducted a massive military parade in Pyongyang to celebrate the April 15 anniversary of founder Kim Il Sung's birthday.

The Trump administration is focusing its strategy on tougher economic sanctions, possibly including an oil embargo, a global ban on its airline, intercepting cargo ships and punishing Chinese banks doing business with Pyongyang, Reuters reported last week, citing US officials. "They are an advanced country when it comes to their nuclear weapons programme".

"I'm not sure why failed missile tests, which are still banned by the U.N. Security Council, are considered less provocative", said Kent Boydston, a North Korea-focused research analyst at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Other reports by VgToday

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