Trump's master plan to running the government: Shutting it down

Lauren Perry
May 3, 2017

President Donald Trump threatened Tuesday to force a government shutdown later this year after congressional Democrats and Republicans struck a budget deal that largely neglected his priorities.

Mr. Trump said the "hotly contested budget" provides a $21 billion increase in defense spending, something that Mr. Trump said was achieved without "any touting like the Democrats did". Both of them ended up slamming Senate Democrats, saying they almost led the government to a shutdown with their reluctance to allocate any funds for President Trump's border wall in the government's new funding bill.

It does not include funding for the proposed US-Mexico border wall or include language stripping federal money from so-called sanctuary cities.

Democrats touted the lack of funding for the border wall. Republicans hold a slim majority of 52 seats meaning Democrats had the option to filbuster if they did not get concessions.

President Donald Trump had a message for the American people on Tuesday: He was actually the big victor on the budget agreement reached this week.

If the House and Senate do pass the spending bill this week as expected, it will fund government operations through the close of its fiscal year on September 30.

"If you're in a bipartisan meeting, I think it's very unusual for one group to walk out and start spiking the football and say, 'Hey, we won".

It's not clear why a government shutdown in September is preferable to a shutdown today.

"The reason for the plan negotiated between the Republicans and Democrats is that we need 60 votes in the Senate which are not there", Trump tweeted. "I think what you heard this morning was his sense of frustration over how he's getting mistreated by the Democrats on this bipartisan piece of legislation". It also does not fund his border wall. "Our country needs a good "shutdown" in September".

Last month, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell expanded that move to secure approval of Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch.

One senior administration official said Trump was "not happy" as he watched Democrats claim victory in the budget negotiations, and a second senior administration official said Trump was baffled that Democrats felt they could claim victory.

The White House also backed off a threat to withhold Obamacare subsidy payments to insurance companies.

Mulvaney cited a $15 billion infusion of defense spending - about half of what Trump asked for in March - as a huge win. "What a lot of people in America don't realize is appropriations bills, they take 60 votes to pass".

Some Senate Republicans quickly said neither an end to the filibuster rule nor a government shutdown was a good idea.

Trump's trial balloon for a September shutdown comes as Congress prepares to vote on a government spending bill to avoid a funding lapse.

Democrats sharply criticized the President's remarks, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, who said he was "deeply disappointed" by Trump's suggestion.

Other reports by VgToday

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