North Korea leader revisits island strike site

Nick Mcbride
May 6, 2017

North Korea on Friday accused the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and South Korea's intelligence service of a plot to attack its "supreme leadership" with a bio-chemical weapon and said such a "pipe-dream" could never succeed.

Goods produced by North Korea's forced labour would be prohibited from entering the United States, according to the legislation.

Pyongyang alleged that a US backed terrorist group infiltrated North Korea in order to use "radioactive substances and nano-poisonous substances" to target Kim Jong Un during the Day of the Sun military parade on April 15.

It said South Korean agents gave 20,000 dollars (£15,000) and satellite communication equipment to the North Korean to attack Kim during a public event with a bio-chemical weapon.

There is at least one retaliatory plan that includes targeting North Korea's leadership if South Korea feels threatened by nuclear attack.

The U.S. Embassy in Seoul and South Korea's National Intelligence Service were not immediately available for comment, Reuters reported.

The North Korean state media released little information about the alleged assassin, only that he was "human scum" who received about $750,000 from the US and was working with a contact in South Korean intelligence.

Kim Jong-un is reported to be on the verge of launching military strikes against South Korea.

Reclusive North Korea warned this week that United States hostility had brought the region to the brink of nuclear war.

Supporters said the legislation was meant to send a strong message to North Korea.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo was in South Korea this week, conducting "detailed security discussions" with his South Korean counterpart and visiting an island near the border between North and South, the USA military command in South Korea said in a statement Tuesday.

Supporters hoped it would send a strong message to North Korea, amid worldwide concern over the escalation of its nuclear programme. "China and North Korea no longer have the traditional friendly relationship", it added, arguing that "bilateral relations need to be redefined for the new zeitgeist". "The agreement is resolute in its opposition to invasion, yet North Korea has insisted on developing nuclear weapons in violation of UN Security Council resolutions and increasing the risk of a military clash between North Korea and the U.S.", the newspaper said.

Anyone who uses slave labour that North Korea exports to other countries would be subject to sanctions under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, the bill states.

Other reports by VgToday

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