Hong Kong marks 28 years since bloody Tiananmen crackdown

Nick Mcbride
June 6, 2017

After almost 40 years of martial law imposed by the Nationalists on Taiwan, the island in the late 1980s began its own transition to democracy, holding direct presidential elections since 1996.

In another statement, the Society of the Department of Government and Public Administration at CUHK said the June 4 vigils do not present any obstructions to Hong Kong in seeking its own destiny.

[Source] Finally, coming almost full circle, the 450-milliliter bottle of baijiu, a fiery Chinese clear liquor, was carried to Hong Kong, a semiautonomous city that is part of China, by Andrew To, a local democracy advocate. Mr. "There is something we should stick to it, otherwise we will regret someday".

But it's openly discussed in Hong Kong, a special Chinese region with much autonomy. It will be displayed at a Hong Kong museum dedicated to chronicling the bloodshed, just days before the city marks the anniversary with a candlelight vigil. The newspaper interviewed young people born after 1989 asking why they - unlike some of their peers - chose to attend the Victoria Park event that student leaders have criticised as being too "ceremonial".

"Every year we remember".

William Nee, China researcher for Amnesty International, called on the Beijing government to come to grips with the crackdown and end the retaliation against anyone who dares mention the subject.

Alvin Yeung Ngok-kiu, leader of the liberal Civic Party and a lawmaker, questioned whether boycotting the June 4th commemoration could help Hong Kong's democratic development.

A woman walks past a statue of Goddess of Democracy at Hong Kong's Victoria Park, Sunday, June 4, 2017.

The march, which usually attracts tens of thousands, is expected to still go ahead but democracy activists say that it's an attempt to crush dissent ahead of a potential visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping, his first to Hong Kong as Chinese leader.

An annual survey by the University of Hong Kong's Public Opinion Program found this year that 46 percent of the respondents believe that the Beijing students did the right thing in 1989, while 22 percent believe that they did the wrong thing.

Freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law are universal values and common ways of life cherished by people around the world, Mainland Affairs Council Deputy Minister Chiu Chui-cheng (邱垂正) said.

It remained quiet in Beijing during the weekend, although security was beefed up on subways and streets. Bluegogo did not respond to phone and email requests for comment. Estimations range from several hundred to several thousand.

"The students who died still haven't got what they deserve".

"While President Xi Jinping preaches openness on the world stage, his government buries the truth about the Tiananmen Massacre through silence, denial and persecution of those who mark the occasion", said Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch.

The CUHK student union said it will no longer organize or take part in any June 4-related events, noting that the Tiananmen incident no longer holds significance for members of the young generation. "The reputation of the innocent victims killed will be rehabilitated, and justice and peace will be restored in this great land of China, so that we can bring solace to our deceased loved ones!"

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