COVFEFE Act would enter social media posts into presidential record

Candice Alexander
June 13, 2017

The president tweeted and then deleted "Despite the constant negative press covfefe" just after midnight May 31, setting off internet hysteria.

A Democratic congressman from IL has introduced a bill named for President Donald Trump's infamous "covfefe" tweet with the goal of ensuring presidential social media posts are archived.

Two Virginia Democrats vying to be the face of the resistance to President Donald Trump are squaring off in gubernatorial primary.

Bill called COVFEFE Act has been proposed in order to hold US President Donald Trump accountable for his posts on Twitter and other social media platforms.

"If the President is going to take to social media to make sudden public policy proclamations, we must ensure that these statements are documented and preserved for future reference", said Quigley.

"Tweets are powerful, and the President must be held accountable for every post", said Illinois Rep. Mike Quigley, introducing the COVFEFE Act.

President Donald Trump says that actions taken by former attorney general Loretta Lynch during the inquiry into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server were "totally illegal.". Also, including social media under the PRA would make the deletion of tweets a violation of the law. However, between Trump deleting his typo-ridden tweets and the fact the regulation most likely applies only to the official @POTUS account and not to his personal @realDonaldTrump account, one can not be certain the White House is saving all of his tweets as it has said it does.

A USA congressman has written up a bill that calls for the President's social media activity to be archived alongside other official communications.

Quigley, however, pointed to the covfefe tweet as an example of Trump's "unprecedented" use of unfiltered social media posts. Committee members sent a letter to the White House out of concerns about the potential for violating the Presidential Records Act with respect to President Trump's use of Twitter. According to Ars Technica, the court used Trump's tweets on the issues to prove the "travel ban" is an excessively vague executive order that illegally targets people exclusively due to their country of origin.

Quigley also introduced the "Making Access Records Available to Lead American Government Openness (MAR-A-LAGO)" Act in March to require the publication of visitor logs to locations where the commander in chief conducts official business, including Trump Organization properties, in addition to the White House.

Other reports by VgToday

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