Four lines of possible questions for Attorney General Sessions

Lauren Perry
June 13, 2017

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions said he will testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday. He said the Senate Intelligence Committee is the best place to answer those questions.

In his defense, Sessions could cite a memo written by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein that criticized Comey over the Hillary Clinton email investigation.

Comey said Trump told Sessions and other administration officials to leave the room before Trump asked him in February to drop a probe into former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's contacts with Russian Federation.

Sessions is likely to face questions by the Senate Intelligence Committee over his dealings with Russian officials during the campaign and whether he had a role in firing former FBI Director James Comey, who testified last week before the same panel.

And he can expect questions about his involvement in Comey's May 9 firing, the circumstances surrounding his decision to recuse himself from the FBI's investigation, and whether any of his actions - such as interviewing candidates for the FBI director position or meeting with Trump about Comey - violated his recusal pledge.

Briefing congressional appropriators on the Justice Department's budget is a critical part of the attorney general's job.

Trump has been coy about whether any recordings exist of his private conversations with Comey, who was sacked by the president in May.

Tuesday's hearing may also throw new light on the awkward state of the relationship between Trump and Sessions. The Justice Department has said that while Sessions was there, for a speech by Trump, there were no meetings or private encounters.

Sessions may be under a further cloud after Comey suggested the attorney general may have failed to take appropriate steps to protect the Federal Bureau of Investigation chief.

Later, Comey said he was so uncomfortable that he went to Sessions to "implore" him "to prevent any future direct communication between the President and me". Comey was leading that probe.

In response to Comey's testimony, Sessions issued a statement contradicting some of what Comey said.

"I believe the James Comey leaks will be far more prevalent than anyone ever thought possible", Trump tweeted over the weekend.

On Comey's accusations that Trump pressed him to drop the FBI investigation of Flynn, Bharara said "no one knows right now whether there is a provable case of obstruction" of justice. "Totally illegal?" he asked in a tweet.

In a letter Saturday to Sen. Feinstein is the top Democrat on that panel and a member of both.

If he says he has no concerns, which we should fully expect, his answer will be replayed if and when more information comes out about who on the campaign knew what.

Feinstein said she did not necessarily believe Trump was unfit for office, as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has asserted, but said he has a "destabilizing effect" on government. Feinstein said the Judiciary Committee should investigate.

Sessions stepped aside in March from the federal investigation into contacts between Russia and the campaign after acknowledging that had met twice a year ago with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. He had told lawmakers at his January confirmation hearing that he had not met with Russians during the campaign. Reed was on "Fox News Sunday".

If he says yes, it could be an indication there are additional reasons for his recusal, beyond a few meetings with the Russian ambassador, that are not known publicly.

Other reports by VgToday

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER