Democrats Fuming Over Sessions' Refusal to Answer Questions

Nick Mcbride
June 14, 2017

During his opening statement, he made it clear that while he recused himself from the investigation into Russian interference of the 2016 presidential election he was there to defend himself.

Sessions is likely to be asked whether he played a role in Trump's decision to fire Comey.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies during a US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, June 13, 2017. Sessions called the conversations "confidential" but stopped short of invoking executive privilege, saying the privilege could only be invoked by the president. In a response to ME independent Senator Angus King, the attorney general suggested he wanted to keep the president's options open.

Sessions told the committee he is protecting Trump's right to later on assert executive privilege "if he chooses".

A former Republican senator, Sessions was an early supporter of Trump's presidential campaign, but sources say there has been tension between the two men in recent weeks because Trump was annoyed that Sessions recused himself from the Russian Federation probe.

In a hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Attorney General Jeff Sessions refused to answer questions about conversations he had with the president at least seven different times. - Sen. Ron Wyden to Sessions. But Sessions said he had no recollection of that.

Mr. Comey last week said the FBI was "aware of facts" that would have made it "problematic" for Mr. Sessions to be involved in the Russian Federation investigation.

On June 8, former Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey reportedly told the Intelligence Committee during a closed meeting that Sessions may have had a third undisclosed meeting with Kislyak in April 2016 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC, according to CNN. "President, I can't talk about that, '" Sessions testified. But his very public handling of the Clinton email investigation was chief among them.

Kislyak has become a well-known entity in Washington politics, with his profile raised after Trump disclosed classified Israeli intelligence to him in a meeting in the Oval Office last month. "They don't decide prosecution".

"I believe it was the next day that he said something and expressed concern about being left alone with the president, but that in itself is not problematic", Sessions said.

Sessions has landed center stage in the ongoing controversy and criminal investigation into the Trump campaign's ties with Russian Federation because of a question Minnesota Senator Al Franken asked five months ago.

"And I'm not to be able to be rushed this fast". The Oregon Democrat was questioning Sessions about why he could sign the letter recommending the firing of Comey if it violated his recusal.

Harris also asked Sessions to provide the committee with documents, notes, and written correspondence relevant to his testimony, to which Sessions responded he would so where "appropriate".

Sen. Mark Warner, D., Va., asked the attorney general if he had confidence in former FBI Director Robert Mueller's appointment as special counsel to probe whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russian Federation.

Sessions says his recusal was not because he had done something wrong or was, himself, the subject of the investigation. The FBI is part of the Justice Department that Sessions heads. Sessions then recused himself from any involvement in the Russian Federation probe. "It didn't seem to me to be a major problem", Sessions said.

Lawmakers for weeks have demanded answers from Sessions, particularly about meetings he had last summer and fall with the Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak.

He says he is confident that Comey understood and would abide by the Justice Departments rules on communications with the White House about ongoing investigations.

Other reports by VgToday

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