I'm here as long as you want me, Theresa May apologises

Nick Mcbride
June 14, 2017

In a reflection of her newfound humility, May managed a joke at her own expense as Britain's House of Commons got underway in the first sitting after Thursday's general election.

Theresa May has told Tory MPs "I'm the person who got us into this mess and I'm the one who will get us out of it", two sources present at the Conservative backbench 1922 Committee meeting have confirmed.

The 60-year-old leader said she had tapped experience across the "whole of the Conservative Party" when she appointed Michael Gove, a long-serving cabinet minister who had clashed with May when she was home secretary, as agriculture minister.

While some members of her party have said she will have to go eventually, May is expected to stay on as prime minister at least for now.

But her election failure means she must now go into Britain's most complex negotiations since World War Two with her eye firmly on the different factions within her Conservative Party, which has been divided over European Union membership for a generation.

"We are united in our total condemnation of terrorism and our commitment to stamp out this evil", May said ahead of her visit.

However, even though she backed the Remain campaign, she pledged to abide by the will of the British people and take Britain out of the European Union in a so-called "Hard Brexit".

The Conservatives are now trying to secure the support of Northern Ireland's 10 Democratic Unionist Party lawmakers to assure passage of May's program.

The party has been heavily criticised for blocking same-sex marriage, despite the Northern Ireland Assembly voting in favour of it.

In the wake of Friday's setback, Conservative figures have said the party needs to learn the lessons of its failure to win an overall majority and change direction in some key areas.

After the Prime Minister lost her majority thanks to a surge in Labour support from young voters, Mr Corbyn has been hailed as a victor by his MPs - who stood up and applauded as he entered the chamber. "The intent is to ensure that we have the stability of Government in the national interest".

"There can be changes in the offer of Brexit as we go forward", Davidson told reporters in London after meeting May.

DUP leader Arlene Foster arriving at 10 Downing Street in London for talks on a deal to prop up a Tory minority administration.

While the DUP are deeply eurosceptic, they have balked at some of the practical implications of a so-called hard Brexit - including a potential loss of a "frictionless border" with the Republic of Ireland - and talks will touch on efforts to minimize the potential damage to Northern Ireland.

The party supports keeping Britain within the EU's single market, which allows for the free flow of goods, services and people. Ms.

In a blow to the Tories' hopes of agreeing a "supply and confidence" deal, Major warned any agreement could endanger the Northern Irish peace process, adding that he was "concerned, wary and dubious" about how a deal would affect the UK's ability appear impartial.

David Davis, the official in charge of Brexit strategies, told the BBC that the feverish speculation about who could replace May as prime minister - much of it focused on Boris Johnson, Britain's flamboyant foreign secretary - was the "height of self-indulgence".

David Davis, the cabinet member in charge of Brexit, said talks with the European Union may not start on Monday as planned because it would clash with the scheduled date of the Queen's Speech.

Sinn Féin has been critical of the proposed DUP-Conservative alliance, saying it could scupper the Stormont talks because Mrs May's party would be beholden to the unionists and unable to chair negotiations from a neutral position.

Other reports by VgToday

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