Queen's speech 'DELAYED by Theresa May amid election disaster fallout'

Nick Mcbride
June 14, 2017

The Conservative Party's disappointing election result has increased pressure on British Prime Minister Theresa May to take a more conciliatory approach to Brexit, former PM David Cameron said Tuesday, according to the Financial Times.

A senior member of the Democratic Unionist Party has declared that "the future's Orange" as it stood on the brink of a deal to allow Theresa May to stay in power.

An initial round of talks between May and DUP leader Arlene Foster ended with no agreement on Tuesday, although both sides said they were hopeful, with talks to resume Wednesday.

Foster denied allegations that her party would be a negative influence on the national Parliament in the Belfast Telegraph on Monday, saying she was focused on getting a good deal for Northern Ireland in Brexit talks. "I hope that we can reach a conclusion sooner than later".

This could pave the way for another General Election as Mrs May would be unable to pass any laws through the Commons.

After House Speaker John Bercow was re-elected without challenge, a chastened May quipped: "At least someone got a landslide".

The impression of disarray just days ahead of the talks was reinforced by the surprise departure of two ministers from the Department for Exiting the European Union.

"I would expect that conversation to continue tomorrow".

"It's going to be hard, there's no doubt about that, but perhaps an opportunity to consult more widely with the other parties on how best we can achieve it", he said at a conference in Poland, the Financial Times reported.

May on Monday met with Tory backbenchers to discuss her leadership in light of her botched election campaign, which left her party with fewer seats than it had before.

Instead, the vote weakened her grip on power, making her more vulnerable to factions of MPs that oppose her preference for a clean or "hard" split from the EU.

"I got us into this mess, and I'm going to get us out of it", May told her party MPs.

"We don't know when Brexit talks start". The Evening Standard, edited by ex-Treasury chief George Osborne, reported that Cabinet ministers have initiated talks with opposition Labour lawmakers to come up with a "softer", less hard-line divorce from the EU.

Earlier Mrs May chaired a Cabinet meeting in which she attempted to unite her senior ministers over Brexit and her government's wider programme.

"The Tory civil war on the European Union which has ripped it apart since the Maastricht rebellions of the early 1990s, and which the referendum was supposed to solve, is now raging again", said Chris Grey, an academic who specialises in Brexit at Royal Holloway in London. Mrs Foster declined to go into detail about the negotiations but said that government stability, Brexit, counter-terrorism and doing what's right for Northern Ireland economically were high on the agenda.

Even the idea of an alliance is complicated, however.

The linchpin role that the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland is set to play in propping up the minority government of Prime Minister Theresa May has raised many questions about the impact it will have on Westminster and beyond, and crucially on the peace process in Northern Ireland. Sinn Fein's Michelle O'Neill accused the DUP of "betraying the interests" of Northern Ireland.

"My main concern is the peace process", he said.

DUP leader Arlene Foster says it's "complete nonsense" to suggest that her party is homophobic.

Barnier held "talks about talks" with May's Brexit advisor Olly Robbins and British EU ambassador Tim Barrow in Brussels on Monday but they failed to agree on a date for the negotiations to begin, an EU official said.

Other reports by VgToday

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