South Korea names new unification minister to handle North Korea ties

Lauren Perry
June 14, 2017

A suspected North Korean drone had taken photographs of an advanced us anti-missile battery in South Korea before it crashed, while apparently on its way back home, the South Korean military said on Tuesday.

North Korea has about 300 unmanned aerial vehicles of different types including one designed for reconnaissance as well as combat drones, the United Nations said in a report a year ago.

Seoul's Defence Ministry said Tuesday investigators discovered hundreds of photos from the drone's Sony-made in-built camera.

The drone was believed to have crashed because it ran short of fuel while returning to North Korea.

South Korea co-hosted the World Cup in 2002 with Japan, and the organisers of next year's Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang hope North Korea will take part.

In written testimony, Mattis said North Korea is increasing the pace and scope of a nuclear weapons program that leader Kim Jong-Un has stated will one day be capable of striking the United States.

News of the talks comes as Trump's top military officials, Pentagon chief James Mattis and Gen. Joe Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told lawmakers that the threat from North Korea has not diminished. Earlier this month, South Korea halted the deployment of four THAAD launchers to the site in Seongju after newly elected President Moon Jae-in called for an environmental inspection of the area. For a visit proposed by President Trump, President Moon Jae-in will head to Washington on June 28th for a five-day trip that includes his first summit with the USA president.

North Korea has conducted several ballistic missiles tests amid strong sanctions imposed by the United Nations.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in apparently thinks so.

During the London 2012 Olympics North Korea's women's football team walked off the pitch in protest when the South Korean flag was inadvertently shown at their game.

After a North Korean drone was found to have flown over the presidential palace of Cheong Wa Dae and taken pictures of it in 2014, the South Korean military announced plans to ramp up efforts to purchase and develop low-altitude radars targeting drones.

Seoul closed down the Kaesong Industrial Complex in February 2016 in response to North Korea's nuclear and missile tests.

Unsophisticated drones, such as the ones used by North Korea, have steadily become an important issue for USA troops around the world.

"It is rather South Korea who has more demand for drones".

Other reports by VgToday

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